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Xerosicyos

Xerosicyos


XerosicyosA few months ago I was given a few cuttings from a friends xerosicyos and I planted them as I normally do with new succulent cuttings. After about a month, they had shriveled and I had given up hope that I would be able to turn them into successful plants. I had placed them in a pot full of other cuttings and was unable to pull them out without disrupting others, so I just cut them down and left the bottom part of the stem in the pot.

xerosicyos danguyiAs I was putzing through my gardens a few weeks ago I noticed some new growth on the stems of these sad cuttings. In two weeks time I now have little pups on every stem I thought was a goner! The pups are look different than the full grown plant. They are covered with fine white hairs and their leaves seem pointier.

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The xerosicyos is a flowering plant that is part of the Cucurbitaceae family of plants which is the same family which you find watermelon and pumpkins in.  It is commonxerosicyos danguyily referred to as the silver dollar vine and is native to Madagascar. According to my research there are three types of xerosicyos, xerosicyos danguyi, xerosicyos perrieri and a completely different looking xerosicyos pubescens. My cutting is either the danguyi or the perrieri.

Succulents really are amazing plants. Just when you have given up all hope of survival, they surprise you and burst back to life!


 

crassula mesembryanthemoides

crassula mesembryanthemoidesOn another note, my crassula mesembryanthemoides bloomed and I almost missed it! This beauty put out a foot tall raceme of tiny pink and yellow flowers. Sadly as I was taking the flower photos I broke the stem, but at least I got the photo!

crassula mesembryanthemoides flowers


Have a succulent weekend everybody!

Don’t forget to enter our FREE succulent contest this month. Click here to enter.

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Echeveria

Echeveria


echeveriaThe largest genus of succulents in the Crassulaceae family is the ever-famous echeveria. This flowering succulent happens to be one of our favorites, who doesn’t love a bright pink, teal, purple or orange rosette as a showpiece in any planter or garden! Echeverias range in size from one inch to two feet across and most of them thrive in bright places and direct sunlight but many do fine in the shade. We have many echeverias that live in bright spots indoor as well as in shadier areas of our nursery and do just fine. Some are frost tolerant and most will do fine down to 45 degrees F. Echeverias can adapt and are suitable as indoor plants.

echeveriaThe echeveria succulent plant is native to areas in Mexico and down to the Northwestern part of South America. They were first named after a botanical artist from the 18th century, Atanasio Echeverria y Godoy. Some people refer to the echeveria species as “hens and chicks”, however there are other genera of succulents, mainly sempervivum, that are also referred to as such.

Echeveria Species


echeveriaThere are hundreds of named species of echeveria but there are tens of thousands of man-made hybrids as well, with only a fraction of those hybrids being true cultivars. This makes 100% accurate identification challenging. Some of our favorite echeverias include the echeveria afterglow, echeveria agavoides and echeveria pulvinata.

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Echeveria are polycarpic, meaning they can flower numerous times in their life unlike the monocarpic aeonium. Our oldest echeveria, an echeveria ‘blue waves’, blooms from July until October and every year it seems to give us more and more racemes of gorgeous pink flowers.

Succulents and Spiders

Succulents and Spiders


 

succulents and spidersWho says that slinging succulents is not a dangerous job! Succulents and spiders are plentiful at Fat Plants! As I was packaging orders I took a break to admire the flower I just noticed from an echeveria runyonii that I have growing on my palm tree. As I leaned in to get a better view I felt that awesome feeling of walking through a spider web, however this was more like a 50 pound fishing line!

I followed the string 20 feet across the patio to one of the several  podocarpus in the nursery and look what I found:  An orb-weaver the size of a very large snail and her nest! I enjoy spiders as much as I enjoy root canals and snakes but I faced my fears to get a few photos for you. Yes, they are harmless, but seriously-who likes to be surprised by a hairy creature with 3 inch legs, 8 eyes and a web as tough as a bug net! This is not my first nor will it be my last to-close-for-comfort moments with a spider but it reminds me again that succulents are not only attractive to humans and it is always best to wear gloves when you are working in your garden.


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Succulents and SpidersOn a pleasant note, this is the first flower I have seen from this echeveria ‘topsy-turvy’ and I have had him for 3 years!

Don’t forget to enter the FREE SUCCULENT contest for September! We will be giving away 3 ten packs of awesome cactus and succulent cuttings at the end of the month! Enter for free here.

Aeoniums

Aeoniums


aeoniumEven people who don’t typically like succulents don’t seem to mind the fabulous aeonium plant. I just walked through my gardens and counted 20 types of aeoniums. There are kiwis, Cyclops, zwartkops, haworthii, velour, arboreum, canariense, lindleyi, undulatum, gomerense and decorum to name a few.




aeoniumsAeoniums
come mainly from the Canary Islands and a few places in central Africa. They are fantastic for xeriscaping however they do require a little more water than most of their fleshy cousins. Aeoniums are not particularly happy in freezing temperatures but seem to manage moderate heat, although I have heard of the entire root system dying which eventually kills the plant if they get too hot. I have personally never had any heat death in my gardens, but I have seen it in hotter places. Most are able to handle temperatures as low as 25 to 30 degrees F. Aeoniums can be grown indoors or outdoors in pots as well as in the ground.

aeoniumsPart of the popular Crassulaceae family there are many succulents that are sometimes confused with aeoniums. Almost all are rosette shaped, as are many echeveria, graptopetalums and dudleyas. You can tell it is an aeonium by the way that their leaves attach to their basal stem. It is almost like there is a thin fiber that attaches them so when you remove the leaves the stem is not typically affected. They range in size from 1 inch in diameter to over a foot in diameter!

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Aeoniums are monocarpic, meaning they flower once and die. aeoniumsThis is a bittersweet ending and if the plant is not a branching type, which thankfully most are, this is the end of the road. Most of the time there are plenty of pups that have grown along side the flowering stem that will take over when the stem with flowers dies.

The photos above are the final flower from an aeonium cyclops. To the left is the final flower of an aeonium undulatum.


aeoniumsAs I went back through my notes I keep about succulents I will someday discuss on this blog I realized that I could go on and on and on just talking about the aeoniums I have in my garden. In the future I hope to be able to have entire posts dedicated to each cultivar but to keep you interested I will just focus on the ones that fascinate me the most.

There are probably hundreds of variations/hybrids of aeoniums that haven’t been named yet, which only adds to confusion when you are trying to identify yours. The most popular is the aeonium arboreum. This is the classic green aeonium with mid-sized rosettes that have longer, thin flimsy leaves. They are known to be able to grow over 6 feet in height; however the tallest we have had in our gardens at full bloom was about four feet. This plant is in the parentage of many of the newer cultivars making it sometimes quite difficult to know who is what.

aeoniums

aeoniumsaeoniumsArboreum atropurpureum – this green aeonium arboreum has purple ends on its leaves. They can almost completely fade into green if they are in the shade and turn into a gorgeous maroon purple in full sun. We have them from all green to all purple in our yard.

aeoniumsAnother favorite aeonium is the arboreum ‘Zwartkop’. This and some hybrids it has mothered and fathered are probably the most ornamental of all the succulents. Their leaves are a reddish aeoniums black that looks almost all black in full sun. Here is where it starts to get crazy!

aeoniumsSo you may have several large aeonium that look almost identical, yet they are different in a few ways. The aeonium Voodoo is a perfect example. This stunner has the same parentage as the Cyclops except the roles of the parents are reversed. The voodoo has a Zwartkop mother and an aeonium undulatum as the father, tends to be a solitary plant and has larger rosettes that are the dark red to purple with a slight green eye while the Cyclops, otherwise known as the giant red aeonium, will not get as large and has a much bigger, green center than its friend. I honestly have trouble telling the two apart.

Overwhelming, even for a plant lady! Have a fabulous weekend!

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Graptoveria Fred Ives

Graptoveria Fred Ives


Graptoveria Fred IvesPart of the stonecrops family this beautiful echeveria hybrid can reach up to 2 feet in width! It was once sold as an echeveria Perle Von Nurnberg. Parentage is said to be the graptopetalum paraguayense X echeveria gibbiflora. Our Graptoveria Fred Ives have done well in the ground and in pots outdoors and indoors they have done well and stayed a bit smaller.

Graptoveria Fred IvesTypical hardiness to 25 degrees this durable hybrid succulent turns a beautiful translucent pink, salmon, coral and purple tint when it is in fun sun.

Some of the Fred Ives we have growing in the shade are a light blueish green with a hint of rose. This graptoveria is native to North America and is fantastic for xeriscaping. It gives your gardens fantastic contrast! I have seen landscape designs where hundreds of these beauties are used and it is breathtaking. They are a clumping shrub and can grow in height over 2 feet if they have the space to grow.

Graptoveria Fred Ives
Graptoveria Fred Ives Flowers

The flowers of this favorite are a pale yellow and arrive in early spring on long racemes that can shoot over 2 feet in the air. I just cut the last stem of dead flowers from my vertical wall. We had a long spring-early summer of showy flowers.

This graptoveria is easy to propagate. We have grown countless plants from leaves, some of which have reached over 10 inches in diameter! We also cut, prepare and replant these rosettes and have had no problem with cuttings that are 3 inches in diameter to those that are ten inches across!

cresting Graptoveria Fred IvesOne of the more fascinating things that we have happening right now is the cresting Fred Ives I have that is starting to outgrow it’s pot. I purchased this plant about 5 years ago because it had one piece that looked like it was starting to crest. At the time I had no idea what that meant, I just knew it looked really cool. One of the rosettes was normal shaped while the other had multiple heads! I have replanted this guy probably 20 times over the course of it’s life in my yard and he always seems happy. Oddly, he sometimes has offshoots that have no mutation. I like to cut those guys off and replant them elsewhere.

cresting graptoveria leafIn my recent front yard revamp I found this leaf hidden under a large plant. This is the first leaf I have had that has grown a crested plant! I am more than ecstatic and am trying to get more of the leaves to do this! Cresting is a mutation, read more about it in our recent post here.

I will be taking time-lapse photos of this leaf and will create a page for you to watch with me in the near future.


Graptoveria Fred Ives in a potSerious Plant Lady

The planter to the right is one of my prized planters. This pot is HUGE! I recently had to do some HOA required plant removal from my front yard and being that there is no rule against potted plants, I borrowed this four foot tall planter from a neighbor and filled it with my favorites from the ground. It is taller than me and you can see that I have several ten plus inch graptoveria’s accenting the arrangement. I hope I never have to move this pot – it may not be possible.

 

Crassula Falcata

Crassula Falcata


Crassula falcata, airplane plant, propeller, plant

AKA Propeller plant, scarlet paintbrush and airplane plant. This odd shaped succulent has blue to green with a hint of silver leaves that sit horizontally and actually do look like airplane propellers. We have been able to propagate these easily by taking cuttings. As with most cuttings it is best to let it callous over for a few days before planting. Crassula falcata is one of our favorite succulent plants.

Stacked crassulas are fun to grow, perfect for xeriscaping or pots and a good conversation piece. Here is a great article from Dave’s Garden for beginners on these delightful succulents.

crassula falcataThis gorgeous fat plant is just coming into bloom in our gardens. They are summer bloomers and this is the first summer that I am seeing these flowers in my garden. Their flowers start as a green ball of tiny buds. As they grow and start to open you could be fooled into thinking you are about to get a pink flower.

 

 

Gardening as Therapy

Gardening as Therapy


 

There is something so calming and therapeutic about gardening. Especially when your garden is full of strange succulents in bloom. I may be a tad bit obsessed with the echeveria ‘elegans‘ that are blooming throughout my yard but their fluorescent pink and yellow flowers can bring a smile to my face even when I have a busy 2.5 year old pulling at my leg.

Gardening as Therapy Gardening as Therapy Gardening as Therapy echeveria 'elegans' echeveria 'elegans'

echeveria 'elegans'Betsy Dru Tecco’s article “A Therapeutic Garden” from Better Homes and Gardens is a fantastic reference article on using gardening as therapy. Being in touch with nature can be stimulating for the mind, body and soul. Gardening is an excellent activity to do with your children as well. Even at age 2.5, my son is aware of  succulents and other plants when we are out around San Diego. He has his own little garden, 75% of it contains his rock collection and a few toy cars, but he is always mindful of his plants. He is learning that he needs to “be gentle” and the responsibility of taking care of something.

Plectranthus coleoides Cerveza n Lime

Plectranthus coleoides Cerveza n Lime


This fuzzy annual has been growing happily in our gardens from shady areas to full sunny areas. We also have several as houseplants who are just as happy. This wonderful little beauty is heat and drought-tolerant, very fragrant and has been impressively hard to kill. This Plectranthus coleoides Cerveza n Lime is probably the most fragrant plant we have in our yard.

We use this plant in most of our succulent arrangements, in our garden beds and in planters. Plectranthus seem to grow quickly and with the right cutting techniques, you can turn a single stem into a thriving little bush in a few months.

Here are some photos we took over the weekend of our fuzzy little friend.

Plectranthus coleoides 'Cerveza 'n Lime
Plectranthus coleoides ‘Cerveza n Lime’
Plectranthus coleoides 'Cerveza 'n Lime
Plectranthus coleoides ‘Cerveza n Lime’

Macro Photography – Succulents

Macro Photography – Succulents


macro photography - succulents up close
Echeveria

Succulents are the most interesting plants. I am a broken record, as I seem to mutter those words daily. It is almost as though they have their own personaltities and every day I discover something new about one or more of the thousands in my gardens. After receiving a new lens from my father for my birthday, taking a class at YouTube University to learn how to use it,  I decided to have a little photo time with my plants this morning.

Plectranthus coleoides 'Cerveza 'n Lime'
Plectranthus coleoides ‘Cerveza ‘n Lime’

Two of my favorite times of the week are just after the sun comes up on Saturday and Sunday mornings.  It is especially fantastic the morning after a good rainfall. Although it didn’t rain last night, I did feed and soak most of my yard with leftover rainwater I collected last month last night.

All of my plants are perky and almost smiling. Ready for a beautiful day of California sunshine. Hopefully as time progresses I will improve with my camera skills and be able to capture the sense I get in my yard so I can share it with you with photography and not just my words.

Flowering Succulents – Echeveria

Flowering Succulents – Echeveria


buy succulents onlineWe are learning that the best way to accurately identify a succulent is by looking at its flower. One of our favorite flowering succulents right now is the flowers given off by the popular succulent, the echeveria.

The echeveria is a rosette style succulent with firm, fleshy, linear, spoon-shaped, colorful leaves. This plant can be an evergreen perennial or can be a sub-shrub which contains several bunches of rosettes.

Flowering Succulents
Echeveria ‘blue waves’

The  racemes of an echeveria have several umbrella shaped flowers in many beautiful colors which bloom in mid-summer, however the leaves of this fat plant are what makes it so popular. The are truly chubby succulents.

Echeveria are part of the Crassulaceae plant family and are commonly referred to as stonecrops. It was named after the Spanish botanist Atanasio Echeverria Codoy. This succulent is native to Mexico but can also be traced to Texas and South America. Most of the echeveria’s grow in higher elevations with low humidity where temperatures never get too hot. Some species only live on cliff faces where all excess water drains off of them.

echeveria blue curlsThere are over 180 different echeveria species and they are very hard to correctly identify. Some are referred to as “Hens and Chicks” which can be confusing because sempervivums are also referred to as “Hens and Chicks”, which is another rosette shaped genus. This is one of the reasons we find so much misidentification with this plant.

Most echeverias are green, gray or bluish colored leaves. Some of them will change color based on their environment, such as temperature or sunlight. As bright and gorgeous as these succulents are, they are not tropical plants.

Echeverias are winter hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture planting zones 9 through 12. They are very easy to care for and propagate. Echeverias are a water-wise plant. Some of our echeverias have gone months without water. This succulent grows best in nutrient-rich soil in full sun. Make sure your echeverias are planted in well-drained containers or areas of ground.

We have several success stories of echeveria surviving happily indoors in a sun room in North Dakota for years. Several cuttings were placed in a pot roughly 2 years ago. They have definitely not grown as they do in California, but they have become strong plants. Just recently they started to shoot off their first flowers!

Buy some echeveria today!

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