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Aeoniums

Aeoniums


aeoniumEven people who don’t typically like succulents don’t seem to mind the fabulous aeonium plant. I just walked through my gardens and counted 20 types of aeoniums. There are kiwis, Cyclops, zwartkops, haworthii, velour, arboreum, canariense, lindleyi, undulatum, gomerense and decorum to name a few.




aeoniumsAeoniums
come mainly from the Canary Islands and a few places in central Africa. They are fantastic for xeriscaping however they do require a little more water than most of their fleshy cousins. Aeoniums are not particularly happy in freezing temperatures but seem to manage moderate heat, although I have heard of the entire root system dying which eventually kills the plant if they get too hot. I have personally never had any heat death in my gardens, but I have seen it in hotter places. Most are able to handle temperatures as low as 25 to 30 degrees F. Aeoniums can be grown indoors or outdoors in pots as well as in the ground.

aeoniumsPart of the popular Crassulaceae family there are many succulents that are sometimes confused with aeoniums. Almost all are rosette shaped, as are many echeveria, graptopetalums and dudleyas. You can tell it is an aeonium by the way that their leaves attach to their basal stem. It is almost like there is a thin fiber that attaches them so when you remove the leaves the stem is not typically affected. They range in size from 1 inch in diameter to over a foot in diameter!

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Aeoniums are monocarpic, meaning they flower once and die. aeoniumsThis is a bittersweet ending and if the plant is not a branching type, which thankfully most are, this is the end of the road. Most of the time there are plenty of pups that have grown along side the flowering stem that will take over when the stem with flowers dies.

The photos above are the final flower from an aeonium cyclops. To the left is the final flower of an aeonium undulatum.


aeoniumsAs I went back through my notes I keep about succulents I will someday discuss on this blog I realized that I could go on and on and on just talking about the aeoniums I have in my garden. In the future I hope to be able to have entire posts dedicated to each cultivar but to keep you interested I will just focus on the ones that fascinate me the most.

There are probably hundreds of variations/hybrids of aeoniums that haven’t been named yet, which only adds to confusion when you are trying to identify yours. The most popular is the aeonium arboreum. This is the classic green aeonium with mid-sized rosettes that have longer, thin flimsy leaves. They are known to be able to grow over 6 feet in height; however the tallest we have had in our gardens at full bloom was about four feet. This plant is in the parentage of many of the newer cultivars making it sometimes quite difficult to know who is what.

aeoniums

aeoniumsaeoniumsArboreum atropurpureum – this green aeonium arboreum has purple ends on its leaves. They can almost completely fade into green if they are in the shade and turn into a gorgeous maroon purple in full sun. We have them from all green to all purple in our yard.

aeoniumsAnother favorite aeonium is the arboreum ‘Zwartkop’. This and some hybrids it has mothered and fathered are probably the most ornamental of all the succulents. Their leaves are a reddish aeoniums black that looks almost all black in full sun. Here is where it starts to get crazy!

aeoniumsSo you may have several large aeonium that look almost identical, yet they are different in a few ways. The aeonium Voodoo is a perfect example. This stunner has the same parentage as the Cyclops except the roles of the parents are reversed. The voodoo has a Zwartkop mother and an aeonium undulatum as the father, tends to be a solitary plant and has larger rosettes that are the dark red to purple with a slight green eye while the Cyclops, otherwise known as the giant red aeonium, will not get as large and has a much bigger, green center than its friend. I honestly have trouble telling the two apart.

Overwhelming, even for a plant lady! Have a fabulous weekend!

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Aristaloe

Aristaloe


AristaloeI learn something everyday when it comes to succulents. While clearing out the non-HOA approved succulents from my front yard I came across this hidden gem, a gorgeous Aristaloe, or torch aloe. Under a large crassula ovata bush he hid, and probably has been there for years. I love finding what was once a little piece of succulent that I tossed on the ground years before grown into something spectacular!
Researching this little guy I discovered that he is an Aristaloe. This is a new monotypic species, meaning that it is the sole species. When I first found him I was sure that he was some kind of haworthia, or Aloe haworthioides, but as usual I was corrected by Tony from Texas Aloe Growers. Thank you Tony!!!

aristaloeThis succulent is fantastic! Its green leaves are surprisingly soft to the touch with raised white dots. It grows in clumps and its pups can be easily removed for propagation. Coral colored blooms emerged from ling spiky stems that this aloe shoots off mid-summer. This aloe does wonderfully indoors and out and clearly he was happy living in the shade of the crassula.



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aristaloeThe aristaloe can handle temperatures to 44 degrees F and is happiest in well-draining medium. From my research he does well growing on the tops of mountains! I have placed him in a crystal candy dish with sempervivums, plectranthus, sedum and a variety of other beauties that will soon outgrow this dish. We have 3 gorgeous 5″X5″ crystal candy dishes full of gorgeous succulent plants and cuttings available in our succulent store, only one has an aristaloe! Enjoy this dish for several months and then create several new planters as they outgrow their home.

SucculentsFor more information on the aristaloe:

Wikipedia gives a great background on the Aloe aristata.

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Kalanchoe blossfeldiana

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana


kalanchoe blossfeldianaKalanchoe blossfeldiana is a popular succulent native to Madagascar, and sometimes referred to as the christmas kalanchoe or florist kalanchoe. It is glabrous, which in botany means has a feature that is smooth and glossy.  This kalanchoe has compact clusters of leaves and forms heads of tubular flowers that have numerous, up to 50 on some, flower buds per stem. Our kalanchoe blossfeldiana bloom in the late fall and into early winter.

kalanchoe blossfeldianaKalanchoe blossfeldiana seems to be the happiest with at least four hours of sunlight per day and as most succulents, living in a well-draining medium. They prefer cooler temperatures and but do not like it when it the temperature is under 50 degrees F. This succulent does well indoors and outdoors, however we do not recommend planting in a place where it gets bright direct sun all day.

Mokalanchoe blossfeldianast florists toss out this plant after it blooms, however proper pruning can make your kalanchoe bloom several times per year. Pruning encourages more branches with eventually leads to more flowers. To make your Kalanchoe blossfeldiana bloom it needs 13 to 14 hours of darkness per day. We have noticed that new buds began to form in roughly 30 to 40 days but we have also experienced kalanchoe that have retired from blooming completely. Several new plants we have propagated from these retired kalanchoes do flower after about a years time.

We use this kalanchoe often to make living succulent wreaths and in other projects. We have enjoyed red, yellow, white, purplish-pink, pink and orange flowers from our various blossfeldianas.

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 Don’t forget to enter the August Free Succulent contest!

Kalanchoe Luciae or Kalanchoe Thyrsiflora

Kalanchoe Luciae or Kalanchoe Thyrsiflora


 

Kalanchoe Luciae or Kalanchoe Thyrsiflora
Kalanchoe Thyrsiflora

As I was doing my research on the paddle plant, which I have always called Kalanchoe thyrsiflora, I realized that I actually have two types of paddle plants growing in my gardens. With so many other people making the same mistake and publishing it online, it can be confusing. I found a great article from San Marcos Growers explaining the difference. So, is it Kalanchoe Luciae or Kalanchoe Thyrsiflora?

Kalanchoe Luciae or Kalanchoe Thyrsiflora
Kalanchoe Luciae Flowers

Both succulents are obviously kalanchoes, which are part of the Crassulaceae family. Dave’s Garden has a great introduction to kalanchoe article you should check out. This article will also lead you to the San Marcos Growers link.

Kalanchoe Luciae
Kalanchoe Luciae

I had noticed that several of my paddle plants seemed to be shorter and stalkier, but more importantly, the red on the tops of the paddles is the deep almost burgundy color. The flowers of the luciae are not as fragrant as those of the thyrsiflora. They are also white with yellow tint while the petals of the thyrsiflora are a bright yellow.

The thyrsiflora is covered with a white chalk-like substance that comes off on our hands if you touch it.

We have kalanchoe luciae plants for sale in our store. Starting in 4 inch pots up to one gallon pots. Some of these guys have paddles three feet tall.

Crassula Falcata

Crassula Falcata


Crassula falcata, airplane plant, propeller, plant

AKA Propeller plant, scarlet paintbrush and airplane plant. This odd shaped succulent has blue to green with a hint of silver leaves that sit horizontally and actually do look like airplane propellers. We have been able to propagate these easily by taking cuttings. As with most cuttings it is best to let it callous over for a few days before planting. Crassula falcata is one of our favorite succulent plants.

Stacked crassulas are fun to grow, perfect for xeriscaping or pots and a good conversation piece. Here is a great article from Dave’s Garden for beginners on these delightful succulents.

crassula falcataThis gorgeous fat plant is just coming into bloom in our gardens. They are summer bloomers and this is the first summer that I am seeing these flowers in my garden. Their flowers start as a green ball of tiny buds. As they grow and start to open you could be fooled into thinking you are about to get a pink flower.

 

 

Support San Diego LGBT Community Center

Support San Diego LGBT Community Center

 


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